Suppose a computer sends a frame to another computer on a bus topology LAN. The physical destination address of the frame is corrupted during the transmission. What happens to the frame? How can the sender be informed about the situation? Explain?

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4.Suppose a computer sends a frame to another computer on a bus topology LAN. The physical destination address of the frame is corrupted during the transmission. What happens to the frame? How can the sender be informed about the situation? Explain?

In a bus topology LAN, all devices are connected to a common communication channel known as the bus. When a computer sends a frame to another computer, the frame travels along the bus, and all devices connected to the bus receive the frame. However, only the intended recipient computer should process the frame based on its physical address (MAC address) embedded in the frame.

If the physical destination address of the frame is corrupted during transmission, the following scenarios can occur:

  1.     Frame Ignored: The corrupted frame reaches all devices on the bus, including the intended recipient. However, since the destination address is incorrect, all devices (including the intended recipient) will compare the destination address in the frame with their own MAC address. When the comparison fails, they will simply ignore the frame, and no action will be taken.
  2.     Frame Flooding: In some cases, network devices may be designed to broadcast or flood frames with a corrupted destination address. This means that they will assume that the corrupted frame is intended for all devices on the bus and will pass the frame to all connected devices. This can lead to unnecessary network traffic and increased collision probability.


To inform the sender about the situation, the data link layer protocol used in the bus topology LAN may employ a mechanism called "ACK" (Acknowledgment) or "NACK" (Negative Acknowledgment) to handle frame acknowledgment and error reporting:

  1.     ACK: If the destination computer successfully receives the frame, it can send an acknowledgment (ACK) signal back to the sender to indicate that the frame was received correctly. The sender will then know that the frame reached its destination and was processed successfully.
  2.     NACK: If the destination computer detects an error (e.g., a corrupted destination address) in the frame and cannot process it, it can send a negative acknowledgment (NACK) back to the sender. The NACK will inform the sender that there was an issue with the frame transmission, and corrective actions may be taken, such as re transmitting the frame.


It's essential to have proper error detection and acknowledgment mechanisms in place to ensure reliable data transmission and avoid unnecessary network congestion in bus topology LANs. The specific protocol used for error handling and acknowledgment will depend on the data link layer protocol implemented in the LAN, such as Ethernet or IEEE 802.3.

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